Menstrual Hygiene: The ‘HER’ Project

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on telegram
Share on email

Menstrual hygiene is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, about the menstrual cycle, as defined by the Terminology Action Group of the Global Menstrual Collective.

    Women all over the world face challenges with regards to achieving optimum menstrual hygiene, with girls in developing countries having their fair share of these challenges, if not more. To achieve optimum menstrual hygiene and health, all females irrespective of their age should have access to information related to menstruation and their menstrual cycle throughout their life. All females should be able to cater to their bodies during their menstrual cycle with specific regard to their safety and privacy.

    An aspect of menstrual hygiene that is often overlooked is the ability of all females to obtain medical care for menstrual cycle-related disorders and pain relief. The menstrual cycle, like other natural processes experienced by females such as childbirth, is laced with myths that seek to define a woman based on her ability to bear all these without seeking any form of pain relief. These myths attempt to ridicule women who seek pain relief and care during these times, and any attempt by any female to alleviate the pain is seen as a taint to womanhood. Also, myths such as “women are always menstruating”, “menstrual blood is dirty blood”,  “a woman’s feelings about any issue can be dismissed when she is menstruating”, and  “hormones define women”, are a few of the many myths that undermine achieving excellent menstrual hygiene.  Many females especially girls in developing countries face discrimination, menstrual-related exclusion, and exclusion in many if not, all aspects of their life.

In the bid to ensure every woman experiences apt menstrual hygiene, all females should have access to menstrual materials, sanitation, and facilities. Unfortunately, this is not so for many women especially girls in developing countries.

The Liquid Love Foundation ‘HER’ project seeks to provide girls in deprived communities access to sanitary products every month to help in their menstruation. Also, the project seeks to provide young girls with the necessary education on menstrual hygiene. This can go a long way to help them and keep them abreast with their menstrual health requirements.

Liquid Love Foundation has set out a target to reach a minimum of 1000 girls in the next 5 years. This goal although daunting can be achieved with the help of the collective members in the foundation in addition to various sponsors.

The project is launched in addition to shirts with inscriptions on menstruation and menstrual hygiene. Proceeds from the sale of the shirts are used to raise funds for the ‘HER’ project. 

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on whatsapp
Share on telegram
Share on email